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  #1  
Old 12-19-2005, 10:52 PM
Kirongosi Kirongosi is offline
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Default UV Filter

Ultra Violet filter which is recomended for film photography as an anti glare protection, is it also recomended for digital-electronic
photography ? I am a freshman in this field.
I know that this is not the most suited place for such a question, but with so many specialists, I am risking to pose the problem.
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  #2  
Old 12-20-2005, 01:49 AM
vapours vapours is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

I haven't found any difference with or without it on to tell you the truth. I think most people have the feeling that extra glass on your lens will only decrease the quality of the shots you take.

Since buying a new lens I haven't used any filters at all, because I stupidly went out and spent $100 on filters for the kit lens which I never use now.
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  #3  
Old 12-20-2005, 02:55 AM
green green is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

The primary use of UV filter is to reduce the fog effect that is caused by harsh sun at sea level or in altitude.

Now, since this type of filter doesn't affect much the picture, many people (I'm one of them) use it to protect the front lens of their lenses; better scratch or break the 50$ filter than the 500$ lens.
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  #4  
Old 12-20-2005, 03:50 AM
mlopes mlopes is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

yep... that's the point Romain ;)
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  #5  
Old 12-20-2005, 04:53 AM
vapours vapours is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

Good point. I guess I should really have one on my lens for protection if I don't notice any difference. I've just heard a lot of people say that extra glass does decrease image quality.
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  #6  
Old 12-20-2005, 06:01 AM
jinju jinju is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

Ive got a 400+ dollar lens on my camera...All Im thinking about is protection. Does it decrese image quality? If so I doubt its really much at all. Im willing to give it up to protct the glass.
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  #7  
Old 12-20-2005, 01:26 PM
Kirongosi Kirongosi is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

UV filters are in truth very effective in film photography, specially when operating on landscapes under sun light; it effectively reduces the foggy effect caused by super sensibility of films to frequencies above violet, present on such conditions. I have noticed that on many years of film photography. The difference is most perceptible when you use small grain negatives for large ampifications. It is not only extra glass. Filters always have a corrective factor, although on UV ones it is equal to 1. It is clear that it must be absolutely clean. So, my question should have been: electronic photo sensors, are they also super sensible to frequencies above violet, as chemical films are, or they operate only inside the visible light band ? Truly it is a very technical question.
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  #8  
Old 12-20-2005, 01:46 PM
Darren Darren is offline
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Default Re: UV Filter

My understanding is that digital sensors are not sensitive to UV at all; therefore you will not benefit photowise at all from having one on your lens. The two extra surfaces of glass however can do nothing but ADD flare; there is no way a filter will reduce it. Buying good quality, multicoated filters will help to bring this to a minimum, but there will always be cases where a filtered lens might flare when an unfiltered lens will not.

BTW, films now are not very sensitive to UV either. The only time a UV filter is likely to provide a clearer photo is at high altitudes, where the UV index is considerably higher. At sea level or close it will not do what it is intended to.

BTW II, back when I was shooting slides, I did some fairly controlled tests using a good quality UV filter (B&W). In my tests, under a loupe, the filtered photos did look just slightly less sharp. Sometimes the difference was minimal, sometimes not so minimal. I have never scratched a lens element and I am not all that careful with my stuff. I am not super careful with my camera when I am out taking shots, yet my lens elements are all clear. The danger of scratching an element is minimal IMO, and even if you do, it takes a relatively huge scratch to be visible at all. I remember seeing example photos taken with a lens that had a front element which had actually been cracked from one side to the other. In most photos, this did not show up at all. When it did show up, it was more in terms of flare than anything else.

I don't use filters unless they are called for in a shot, such as a grad or a polarized filter. As I don't do much landscape stuff, I can't remember the last time I had a filter on my lens. If you want to protect your lens, I feel a better thing to do is to make sure that you have a solid lens hood and make sure it is mounted as soon as you are ready to shoot. This will have two benefits. First, it will phycially protect your front element. Secondly, it will improve the look of your photos. Using a hood quickly and consistently improves the contrast in your shots and it also does a lot to reduce the occurance of flare.
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