Forums


Go Back   The TrekEarth Forums >

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-02-2007, 07:17 AM
Ann75's Avatar
Ann75 Ann75 is offline
TE Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 46
Default HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

Hello fellow TE members,

I hope someone can help me out. I recently bought a new camera, I bought the Sony DSC-H5. This is not an SLR camera, but they call it a "prosumer". I do have quite some features and manual options.

I would like to try some photos to get that silky look on the water of the ocean and waterfalls. When I set my controls to "M" for Manual Mode I can set the exposure to what I want and the aperture to what I want, but the "EV" is also displayed and I can't set it manually while in "M" mode.

It sets itself and according to my manual the camera choses the right brightness according to the exposure and aperture I set. I have noticed that during the daylight hours when I tried to capture a photo of an ocean inlet I set the shutterspeed to 1 second and the aperture to f/8.0 the "EV" sets itself to +2.0 V. This left everything looking washed out and my photo looks almost white. Any ideas why that would be, or what I am doing wrong? I am guessing this will not occur with shots at sunrise, sunset, dusk or at night.

Any help or tips are very much appreciated!
Thanks in advance,
Ann :)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-02-2007, 09:52 AM
bibiweb's Avatar
bibiweb bibiweb is offline
TE Expert
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,756
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

Obviously, with a f/8.0 aperture and a 1 second shutter speed, all photos will be totally over-exposed in bright daylight. And this is exactly what your camera is telling you by setting the "EV" to +2.0. A normally exposed photo in these conditions would probably require a 1/500 s shutter speed at f/8.0. So by manually choosing 1 second, you're actually taking a picture with 500 times more light than what is required, thus the over exposure.

If you want to take long exposure photos during daylight hours, the only solution is to artificially darken the scene. This is usually done by placing one or more ND grey filters on the lens. If you can't use filters on your camera, then you'll just have to wait until there's less light (dusk or dawn for example).

Hope this answers your question.
Brigitte
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-02-2007, 07:11 PM
Ann75's Avatar
Ann75 Ann75 is offline
TE Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 46
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

Dear Brigitte,

Thank you so much for the help! This long exposure business is fairly new to me. I am ok with it in the evening when I use a slower shutterspeed for for night shots or to get streaked light effect of the cars going by.

I do have one more question. Let say, I'd wanted to go and take some waterfalls pictures, what would be a good shutterspeed. Like you say, I guess it doesn't need to be 1 second to get the silky look.

Thanks a million, you've been so helpful!
Greetings,
Ann :)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-02-2007, 07:25 PM
bibiweb's Avatar
bibiweb bibiweb is offline
TE Expert
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,756
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

Of course the slower the speed, the more silky the look, but I would say that anything slower than 1/100th of a second would start to give some kind of effect.
Good luck in trying this out! :o)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-02-2007, 11:30 PM
linask's Avatar
linask linask is offline
TE Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 157
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

If you don't have ND filter (it's kind of specialized and usually very expensive filter), regular polarizing filter can help as well. Polarizing filters attached to the cuts half of the light and therefore doubles exposure time.
Also, don't forget to set you camera ISO to the lowest possible value.

Linas
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-07-2007, 10:44 PM
PixelTerror PixelTerror is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 10,334
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

I agree with Brigitte about using a ND grey filter to lengthen exposure, the Cokin system has various mounts to fit on many cameras including non DSLR, possibly Singh Ray will fit too.
Jean-Yves
P.S. having seen a bit of your gallery I'm somewhat surprised you did not go for a DSLR such as the Nikon D50
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-07-2007, 11:54 PM
Ann75's Avatar
Ann75 Ann75 is offline
TE Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 46
Default Re: HELP! Long exposure with a prosumer during daylight

Hello Jean-Yves,

I was afraid that the step from my "point and shoot" Sony Mavica FD85 to a DSLR with tons of options and lenses would be too much for too handle! I am not familiar with manual settings whatsoever and I don't know too much about lenses either. So, I went for a "prosumer or DSLR like" camera with a superzoom which gives me quite a diversity of options and of course I can still use the "auto" setting.

I also thought that a DSLR and some lenses would be too much to pack around on holidays and when we go hiking over here. I love my new camera and I am slowly getting used to the manual mode and playing around with all the different settings and features. I am sure that I will add a DSLR in the future, but for the time being I am very happy with my camera!

I recently bought a Polarizing filter and am thinking of buying the ND filter as well. Does it have to be a specific ND filter? I would be looking at this Sony Neutral Density Filter. Would that one be any good?

Thanks for the tips!
Greetings,
Ann
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:59 PM.



Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.
explore TREKEARTH