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Photographer's Note

This photo was taken at one of the coldest Decembers on record... The light in the background is created from the lights of the town Banbury.

Banbury is a historic market town of North Oxfordshire

Its History according to Wikki:

The area was settled by the Saxons around the late 5th century AD.[6] In about 556 Banbury was the scene of a battle between the local Anglo-Saxons of Cynric and Ceawlin, and the local Romano-British. It was a local centre for Anglo-Saxon settlement by the mid 6th century.[6] Banbury developed in the Anglo-Saxon period [8] under Danish influence, starting in the late 6th century AD. It was assessed at 50 hides in the Domesday survey and was then held by the bishop of Lincoln.

The Saxons built Banbury on the west bank of the River Cherwell. On the opposite bank they built Grimsbury, which was part of Northamptonshire but was incorporated into Banbury in 1889.[9] Neithrop was one of the oldest areas in Banbury, having first been recorded as a hamlet in the 13th century. It was formally incorporated into the borough of Banbury in 1889.[10]

Banbury stands at the junction of two ancient roads: Salt Way (used as a bridle path to the west and south of the town), its primary use being transportation of salt; and Banbury Lane, which began near Northampton and is closely followed by the modern 22-mile-long road. It continued through what is now Banbury's High Street and towards the Fosse Way at Stow-on-the-Wold. Banbury's mediæval prosperity was based on wool.

Banbury Castle was built from 1135 by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln, and survived into the Civil War, when it was besieged. Due to its proximity to Oxford, the King's capital, Banbury was at one stage a Royalist town, but the inhabitants were known to be strongly Puritan. The castle was demolished after the war.

Banbury played an important part in the English Civil War as a base of operations for Oliver Cromwell, who is reputed to have planned the Battle of Edge Hill in the back room (which can still be visited) of a local inn, The Reindeer as it was then known (today's Ye Olde Reine Deer Inn).[11] The town was pro-Parliamentarian, but the castle was manned by a Royalist garrison who supported King Charles I. In 1645 during the English Civil War, Parliamentary troops were billeted in nearby Hanwell village [12] for nine weeks and villagers petitioned the Warwickshire Committee of Accounts to pay for feeding them.[12]


The modern Castle Quay Shopping Centre alongside the Oxford Canal, with Banbury Museum in the background.
The Oxford canal, frozen on November 30, 2010.The opening of the Oxford Canal from Hawkesbury Junction to Banbury on 30 March 1778 gave the town a cheap and reliable supply of Warwickshire coal.[13] In 1787 the Oxford Canal was extended southwards,[14] finally opening to Oxford on 1 January 1790.[15] The canal's main boat yard was the original outlay of today’s Tooley's Boatyard.[16]

Peoples' Park was set up as a private park in 1890 and opened in 1910, along with the adjacent bowling green.

The land south of the Foscote Private Hospital in Calthorpe and Easington farm were mostly open farmland until the early 1960s as shown by the Ordinance Survey maps of 1964, 1955 and 1947. It had only a few farmsteads, the odd house, an allotment field (now under the Sainsbury’s store), the Municipal Borough of Banbury council’s small reservoir just south of Easington farm and a water spring lay to the south of it. The Ruscote estate, which now has a notable South Asian community, was expanded in the 1950s because of the growth of the town due to the London overspill and further grew in the mid-1960s.

British Railways closed Merton Street station and the Buckingham to Banbury line to passenger traffic at the end of 1960. Merton Street freight depot continued to handle livestock traffic for Banbury's cattle market until 1966, when this too was discontinued and the railway dismantled. In March 1962 Sir John Betjeman celebrated the line from Culworth Junction in his poem Great Central Railway, Sheffield Victoria to Banbury. British Railways closed this line too in 1966.

The main station, now called simply Banbury, is now served by trains running between London Paddington and Birmingham via Reading, Oxford and Leamington Spa, and from London Marylebone via High Wycombe and Bicester, the fastest non-stop train taking 68 minutes to London Marylebone (and 62 minutes for the return journey).[citation needed]

Banbury used to be home to Western Europe's largest cattle market,[17] situated on Merton Street in Grimsbury. For many decades, cattle and other farm animals were driven there on the hoof from as far as Scotland to be sold to feed the growing population of London and other towns. Since its closure in June 1998 a new housing development has been built on its site which includes Dashwood Primary School. The estate, which lies between Banbury and Hanwell, was built in between 2005–06, on the grounds of the former Hanwell Farm.

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Photo Information
  • Copyright: Rich Beghin (Ricx) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 994 W: 51 N: 2900] (13495)
  • Genre: Luoghi
  • Medium: Colore
  • Date Taken: 2010-12-21
  • Categories: Natura
  • Esposizione: f/2.8, 1/5 secondi
  • Details: Tripod: Yes
  • More Photo Info: view
  • Versione Foto: Versione Originale
  • Date Submitted: 2011-03-14 14:41
Viewed: 3566
Points: 70
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Additional Photos by Rich Beghin (Ricx) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 994 W: 51 N: 2900] (13495)
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